Cuban Missile Crisis and Tennessee

After the end of World War II Americans had a lot to celebrate. Nevertheless, the country was on edge with the threat of a nuclear attack. Schools prepped students while the government prepared cities and government officials. People feared atomic weapons. Therefore, the Civil Defense department in Tennessee constructed plans, test exercises, and fallout shelters in case of a nuclear attack.

Standards & Objectives

Academic standards
5.62
Examine the meaning and the main events of the "Cold War," including the Space Race, Berlin Wall, arms race, Rosenbergs, and the Cuban Missile Crisis.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.5.4
Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3
Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.5
Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.6
Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.7
Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.9
Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.3
Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.9
Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.2
Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.7
Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.8
Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in...
GLE 0501.1.2
Demonstrate knowledge of strategies and resources to determine the definition, pronunciation, and usage of words and phrases.
GLE 0501.4.1
Conduct research to access and present information.
GLE 0501.4.2
Collect, organize, determine reliability, and use information researched.
GLE 0501.4.3
Present the research results in a written report, citing the resources used.
GLE 0501.6.3
Explore the organizational structures of informational texts.
GLE 0501.8.1
Use previously learned comprehension strategies before, during, and after reading.
GLE 0501.8.2
Experience various literary genres, including fiction and nonfiction, poetry, drama, chapter books, biography/autobiography, short stories, folk tales, myths,...
SPI 0501.1.15
Recognize and use grade appropriate vocabulary within context.
SPI 0501.3.10
Select appropriate time-order or transitional words/phrases to enhance the flow of a writing sample.
SPI 0501.5.1
Locate information to support opinions, predictions, and conclusions.
SPI 0501.5.2
Identify stated or implied cause and effect relationships in text.
SPI 0501.5.6
Make inferences and draw appropriate conclusions from text.
SPI 0501.6.3
Locate information using available text features (e.g., maps, charts, graphics).
SPI 0501.7.2
Determine the main idea in a visual image.
TSS.ELA.5.FL.F.5
Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
TSS.ELA.5.RI.CS.6
Analyze the similarities and differences in points of view of multiple accounts of the same event or topic.
TSS.ELA.5.RI.IKI.7
Locate an answer to a question or solve a problem, drawing on information from multiple print or digital sources.
TSS.ELA.5.RI.IKI.9
Integrate information from two or more texts on the same topic in order to build content knowledge.
TSS.ELA.5.RI.KID.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
TSS.ELA.5.RI.KID.3
Explain the relationships and interactions among two or more individuals, events, and/or ideas in a text.
TSS.ELA.5.RL.CS.6
Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described.
TSS.ELA.5.RL.IKI.7
Explain how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or mood of a text, such as in a graphic novel, multimedia presentation, or...
TSS.ELA.5.RL.IKI.9
Compare and contrast stories in the same genre on their approaches to similar themes and topics.
TSS.ELA.5.RL.KID.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
TSS.ELA.5.RL.KID.3
Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in a text.
TSS.ELA.5.SL.CC.2
Summarize a text presented in diverse media such as visual, quantitative, and oral formats.
TSS.ELA.5.W.RBPK.7
Conduct short research projects that use multiple sources to build knowledge through investigations of different aspects of a topic.
TSS.ELA.5.W.RBPK.8
Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes...
TSS.ELA.5.W.TTP.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information.
 
Alignment of this item to academic standards is based on recommendations from content creators, resource curators, and visitors to this website. It is the responsibility of each educator to verify that the materials are appropriate for your content area, aligned to current academic standards, and will be beneficial to your specific students.
 
Learning objectives: 

The goal of this lesson is to evaluate Tennessean concerns about the Soviet Union’s nuclear weapons and the possibility of a nuclear attack. Students will analyze correspondence regarding the preparing of Tennessee’s Civil Defense and read informational text to be able to speak about the subject knowledgeably. 

Essential and guiding questions: 
  • How did Tennessee prepare for a nuclear attack?
  • What was the goal of the Civil Defense Department?
  • What was the purpose of a fallout shelter?

Lesson Variations

Blooms taxonomy level: 
Applying

Helpful Hints

Materials Needed:

  • Correspondence between Mr. Sutermeister and Governor Frank Clement
  • Copy of letter from Gov. Clement to Oscar Sutermeister
  • “I have…Who Has…” cards, cut into individual cards
  • Personal Preparedness in the nuclear age
  • Tennessee Civil Defense “Test Exercise Memo” for June 14-15, 1954.
  • The letter from Governor F. Clement dated for November 12, 1954.
  • Transcribed address by Governor Clement at the Memphis Civil Defense Banquet on April 20, 1954
  • “Bert the Turtle: Duck and Cover” (1951) Bingo sheet
  • Popsicle stick and pipe cleaner or Construction Paper
  • Fallout Shelter Booklet
  • Family Shelter Designs Booklet
  • The Spoils of our October “Victory”! Political cartoon